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Review Detail

Historical August 21, 2014
a very powerful read
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Is the book engaging / enticing? 
 
5.0
Can you relate to the characters and/or subject matter? 
 
5.0
Can you easily follow the scenes/chapters? Are they descriptive enough? 
 
5.0
Would you recommend this book? 
 
5.0

Christoph Fischer’s, THE BLACK EAGLE INN, the final instalment of his THREE NATIONS TRILOGY is a journey of personal and social movement. The setting is Bavaria both during and after the Great War, but the social issues presented in this epic drama easily reflect the suffering and injustice of our modern times. The skeleton of the story is a family saga headed by the matriarch, Anna, who symbolically cannot produce heirs to continue the greed and callousness that has been the foundation of their success as an important farming institution and owners of the respectable Black Eagle Inn. Human relationships and tolerance are placed on the back burner to maintain the upkeep of their estates and social standing. The author depicts the narrow-mindedness of small town attitudes of this troubled era but he also offers a strong positive message that takes the form of a widespread social guilt for Germany’s past crimes towards humanity. Yet the redemptive trend is still a work in progress – the hatred of Jews is transferred in part to the intolerance of Muslims – homosexuality is legalized but tolerated only from afar – women are at the beginning stage in their march towards acceptance as equal partners. Anna’s legacy cannot continue; her family members must either join the movement towards compassion and acceptance or fall by the wayside. A strong, clear message is unfolded in this well-crafted last instalment. Without a doubt, a very powerful read. I own this book. 

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