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  • According to its author, Beautiful Deconstruction is a novel of...
    According to its author, Beautiful Deconstruction is a novel of loss, of love, a story of growing old. What he doesn’t include in the bio line and very cleverly so is that the story is also an... According to its author, Beautiful Deconstruction is a novel of loss, of love, a story of growing old. What he doesn’t include in the bio line and very cleverly so is that the story is also an observation of a forgotten time, a bygone age, the stiff British upper lip, a life of denial. From the present to the past and back again we journey into the lives of two men Anthony and Douglas as they start a new life in their 40s in France. Marks excellent (as always) observance delight and humour comes into force as he takes on a journey throughout their village life where by reading you feel you are there in a quaint French village, buying a baguette and sipping a café with Pierre, the bar-cafe owner. Visually it is appealing as are the characters he has created, the formidable post office madam, the supermarche owner, his own cackling Spanish housekeeper and the soap sudden laundry mistress. French men appear with cloth caps and cigarettes perched on their upper lip. You can smell the pastis and café as you turn the pages. And just when you think everything is swimming on nicely, in the background is a niggling thought that something has to happen. And it does, very suddenly. The fort that Mark has created is suddenly altered and, as he writes, “the deconstruction has begun.” Marks writing also alters dramatically between humour and sadness. The final chapter between Anthony and Douglas is heart wrenching, the loss of their animals equally so. You wonder how much of the authors own life has been captured, changed and hidden between the lines. Perhaps none, perhaps some. The British stiff upper lip then comes into play, “and then what happened next…” Certain aspects of Anthony and Douglas’s lives are missing and quite rightly so. The timespan is withdrawn but one feels the book is set thirty or so years so. Sex and sexuality is also removed, it isn’t required. This isn’t a love story in the strongest sense but a story of just two men who live together probably for the sake of living. A sad book, a happy book, a beautiful book and one that leaves you smelling the lavender and poppies and harking for a more solitude time. More
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  • Beautiful Deconstruction sees people come to terms with the past, make peace with inner demons and learn to say goodbye to loved ones. A story of love, of loss and time. In...
    Beautiful Deconstruction sees people come to terms with the past, make peace with inner demons and learn to say goodbye to loved ones. A story of love, of loss and time. In short, what it feels... Beautiful Deconstruction sees people come to terms with the past, make peace with inner demons and learn to say goodbye to loved ones. A story of love, of loss and time. In short, what it feels like to grow older. “I learned very early on in my life that nothing was for ever; so I should have been aware of disillusion in early middle age: but, somehow, we try to obliterate early warnings and go cantering along hopefully, idiotically...” Beautiful Deconstruction charts the disintegration of the idyll between Douglas and Anthony as they leave their retreat in France and return full circle for an uncertain future in London. More
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  • John Simmons commented on a review for Nemesis
    Through the gates of night there is wisdom is waiting to be found… Mark has a wonderful way with words and with this new book of prose you are taken on a journey with side notes explaining, in... Through the...
    Through the gates of night there is wisdom is waiting to be found… Mark has a wonderful way with words and with this new book of prose you are taken on a journey with side notes explaining, in... Through the gates of night there is wisdom is waiting to be found… Mark has a wonderful way with words and with this new book of prose you are taken on a journey with side notes explaining, in brief, what each piece actually means or what the basis for the narrative is about. Once again you can sense music behind the dialogue. Think Kate Bush, think Enya, think soft ambient beats behind the spoken word. There is a sense of loss throughout this book, a time of aging, looking back and forward but without any regret. It's almost as if ark has written a biography of his life but mislaid names, dates and events. A book to curl up with on autumn evenings as the wind hurls outside. 5 STARS. More
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  • John Simmons added Nemesis to favorites
    I have been intrigued with the poetic power of “words” ever since I can remember. Symbolism, metaphor, and the magical transformations that can occur when you combine the sounds and...
    I have been intrigued with the poetic power of “words” ever since I can remember. Symbolism, metaphor, and the magical transformations that can occur when you combine the sounds and shapes of... I have been intrigued with the poetic power of “words” ever since I can remember. Symbolism, metaphor, and the magical transformations that can occur when you combine the sounds and shapes of language in unexpected ways. We use words to communicate, to describe, and to express something that cannot easily be. Following on from - A Sorta Fairytale - Nemesis has an arrangement of journeys, in the rain, through the length of a lifetime, amongst history, between emotions, and journeys across great oceans. So although it’s not a ‘themed’ collection of words, as such, there is an underlying connection between the pieces. It's also a book saying goodbye to many things, people, places, old friends. More
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  • John Simmons found helpful a review for Nemesis , written by Nicole Brooks
    "I run back inside, I turn off the light, look out into the open night, my mind flies open and the dark comes white...
    "I run back inside, I turn off the light, look out into the open night, my mind flies open and the dark comes white with falling snow..." Mark Binmore has a way with words. This, his brand new... "I run back inside, I turn off the light, look out into the open night, my mind flies open and the dark comes white with falling snow..." Mark Binmore has a way with words. This, his brand new collection of prose, takes us on a journey of life, his life (maybe?) of nights, days, fog, light and dark ending with question an a final thought. Each piece comes with a liner note, some long and detailed others just a few words so at once you can understand what he is trying to say. If Mark was a pop star this would be his Kate Bush album, it comes to life and should not be left at just words, you can sense rhythm and music behind the lyric. From intriguing individual titles such as Hope Has A Place, Tea House Moon and Like A Bell To A Southerly Wind, Mark has also spent time going back or as he puts it, revisiting a few old pieces breathing new life between the layers. One is called Rockets Tail and Mark writes about being a rocket being fired into the sky, to be beautiful and loved for a few seconds before disappearing into the night. "And you have to let me fly" he cried. There is sense with this book that Mark is saying goodbye to many things but I hope he isn't saying goodbye to his style of prose. It's not poetry in the old fashioned sense, its not even lyrics in the structure of a pop sing but they are words, and words that need to be read. ***** More
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  • A pleasure as always to read something new by Mark. Take Down The Flags appears to be a simple format...
    A pleasure as always to read something new by Mark. Take Down The Flags appears to be a simple format and yet behind the theme there lies a black sinister side. Some of these stories are amusing... A pleasure as always to read something new by Mark. Take Down The Flags appears to be a simple format and yet behind the theme there lies a black sinister side. Some of these stories are amusing "Memories of Aunt Win" could literally be transformed into a TV drama overnight while others provoke a darker tone. This is probably Marks most visual work yet as imagery literally flies off the pages. My favourite is the story "Harry" which describes the working day of a department store caretaker being told that he has to go. It is a sad thoughtful piece of a bygone age and what happens when you get older. A recommended book. More
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